Nov 262013
 

My Goodness! Am I halfway through this series already?
I so greatly enjoyed sharing my rare finds and my loved
legends I study so frequently. See,THIS IS WHY I love this job!
Sometimes it seems a funeral or a wedding are the only reasons
all of Nashville converge in one spot..it used to be the Opry.

As always here is a recap of my past people who earned spots
in this series. ONCE AGAIN IT IS NOT IN ORDER OF IMPORTANCE!

20.Little David Wilkins
19.Glenn Douglass Tubb
18.Autrey Inman
17.Ralph Mooney
16.Elton Britt
15.Grant Turner
14.Johnny Russell
13.Bobby Edwards
12.Sonny Burns
11.Big Al Downing
10.Riley Puckett

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Well Well Well…whom do you think is number 9?
I’ll give you a hint…the Opry.
Number 9 is the very man who created the whole thing and one of country music’s
first characters ‘the Solemn Old Judge” George D. Hay.

George Dewey Hay was born November 9th 1895 in Attica Indiana and he founded the WSM-AM based
show The Grande Ole Opry. Today it is the longest running radio show in history and most likely
will never be dethroned.

On his birthday in 1925 he moved to Nashville and began working for WSM. Hay soon announced WSM
would begin featuring “an hour or two” of old timey music every saturday night and thusly
the Opry was born.

It was originally called WSM Barn Dance and he created the Solemn Old Judge and began the
show with “Let Er Go Boys” and blew a trademark train whistle every show.

One of the first performers on the Opry was Harmonica Wizard Deford Bailey largely
overlooked as the first black country star in history.

During the 1930’s he worked on involving the show with NBC and it finally aired
on television for the first time in 1955.
He made a movie about the Opry in 1940 and in 1947 he brought the Opry to
Carnegie Hall.

He was inducted into The Country Music Hall Of Fame in 1966, and shortly after
On May 8th 1968 Country Music lost him at age 72.

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