Oct 162013
 

Here’s another installment of one of my weekly ongoing series of articles and if you have just joined us here is
a recap of numbers 20,19 and 18.
20. Little David Wilkins
19. Glenn Douglass Tubb
18. Autry Inman

Well let me first off explain to you that I BELIEVE there are THREE staples of the backbone of country music.
The writers,the producers and the steel guitar. I firmly believe that to be true today.
I thought Ashley Monroe released ONE HELL of a good country solo album,wrote by her and produced by Vince Gill.
And the steel guitar was AWESOME!

SO NOW DRUM ROLL PLEASE…WHO IS number 17?

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Ralph Mooney.
He was born in Duncan Oklahoma September of 1928 and we lost him in March 20th of 2011. He was 82 when country music
lost this precious man.
At an early age he developed a signature sound of his own as did many of the guitarists of his era. He played with
many bands and for many country music legends.
His first major cut was co wrote with Chuck Seals and was cut by Ray Price…it was none other than the mega hit
“Crazy Arms”. He once told me he was attracted to the guitar by Leon McAullifes “Steel Guitar Rag”.
And he told me as well he used a butter knife to learn it on a flatop while collecting coke bottles to
buy his first steel guitar.
He refined his style with the help of the Texas Playboy Jessie Ashlock and also played briefly for Wynn Stewart.
He also was a Buckaroo briefly playing on “Fooling Around” and “Under Your Spell Again”.

Alot of people do not know that he was also briefly a member of Merle Haggards Strangers before he was replaced
by Norman Hamlet. He soon became disenchanted by Merle’s heavy traveling schedule.
He did record some of Merle’s most popular and siganture songs, “Sing Me Back Home” “Swingin Doors” and “The Bottle Let Me Down”.

In 1969 he became the steel guitarist for Outlaw Country Music Legend Waylon Jennings and became mostly
noted for providing 20 years of service to him and his band The Waylors.
Waylon believed in the importance of the steel guitar and was critically blasted by the media for placing
Mooney on the front line of the band, right next to Waylon himself.
In fact, you can often times see him right next to Waylon, and many times his volume would be above
Waylon’s vocals.

He is rated as one of the top ten most influential and inventive steel guitarists.
He’s also credited for writing “Foolin” for Johnny Rodriguez.

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